I recently picked up a used CNC Router

It's a big machine for the hobby side of things. I think they call it a 60150. It will hold a 2 foot by 4 foot piece. 220v water cooled spindle. It's a solid machine.

It had been suffering from disuse – not neglect, just simple not getting used enough. Rust pitting on the important bits and some rusting on the threaded rods. A couple of years in an unheated garage without being used to re-coat all the parts in oil will do this.

Not too much work to clean it up. It took a couple of evenings over a couple of weeks. Last night I got the electrical stuff all sorted and got it to move!

So I dug up a bucket, and connected water and electricity to the same spot on the machine. This is generally a bad idea in my experience.

It cuts! A little bit of tweaking, and it cuts correctly!

About an hour into running it, it gave an error and shut down. Not really sure why, but I think it's because the controller got hot. There was a reading of 75c on the screen when I was pushing buttons. I think I found why the controller box was open.

Next project is to improve the airflow in the controller box. I have a plan for this. I will install rubber grommets around the holes the wires poke through too.

I also need to learn about "Speeds and Feeds". CNC Routers have an ideal window where they work well for a given material. The 3D printing methodology of slowing down, sorting things out, then speeding back up does NOT apply to CNC Routing it appears.

Lots of photos in the album. Each one is captioned.

CNC Router Refurb
27 new photos · Album by Mike Creuzer

The RepRap revolution started 6 years ago, today.

6 years ago, today is when the first ‘child’ printer was created.

6 years ago, today, the RepRap revolution started.

RepRaps, or Reproducing Rapid Prototypers are 3d printers that are designed in such a way that you can use one to make a copy of itself. The goal is to be able to use ‘stuff’ that is easily available locally. Today, I could make one using parts bought from Radio Shack, Home Depot, Walmart, and junk inkjet printers sitting in people’s closets, and my existing 3d printer. It’s easier and cheaper to order parts of ebay, but I can cobble one together after a couple hour bike ride.

The hardware is open source –  that means I can download, view, edit, and distribute my changes to the machine for free & legally.

The software is open source – that means I can download, view, edit, and distribute my changes to the software for free & legally.

There are thousands of people who are actively making tweaks and adjustments to the printers & software every single day. Thousands of people who are making these 3d printers better, every day, just for the fun of it.

6 years ago today, the first RepRap begat the 2nd RepRap and the world changed forever.

My college, MSOE, had the largest Rapid Prototyping lab in the world at that time if memory serves correctly. They had millions of dollars in equipment. I remember walking past the glassed windowed RPC and looking at the cool stuff they where making there. Engines for GM, hands for NASA to fit gloves, skulls to solve murder mysteries.

2 years ago, I got my first RepRap for as much money as the TV in my living room – http://mike.creuzer.com/2012/02/i-ordered-my-3d-printer-last-weekend.html. I ordered a kit of parts, and built it over the course of 2 days with help from strangers who where also putting their printers together at the same time.

6 years ago today, RepRaps started a revolution that made 3d printers accessible to me, in my home. My children will grow up never not knowing having having easy access to 3d printers. In their home. My dad remembers when he got indoor plumbing growing up, I remember when our house got it’s own phone number and not a shared number with several of the neighbors. My kids will never not remember a 3d printer or two in their house. This blows my mind. The paradigm shift in their thought processes is revolutionary – http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/07/bella-printed-a-missing-part-for-one-of-her-toys.html.

I’ve come up with a few ideas of my own – hybrid drivelines http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/04/delta-reprap-using-both-belts-and-spectra-fishing-line.html, hooking up my printer to my fish tank http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/01/watercooling-my-makergear-prusa-reprap.html, and a temp monitoring idea across the printer as a hole.

The people who have made the RepRap revolution possible deserve much gratitude. I’ve been able to meet in person many of the ‘key’ people who have made RepRaps possible – the (re)designers of the hardware, the (re)designers of the firmware, the (re)designers of the electronics.

Today, today is Mr. Bowyer’s day. Thank you. We will probably never meet in person, but you have changed my life & my children’s life. For that, Thank you.

I went to the Midwest RepRap Fest (#MRRF) in Goshen Indiana this year

I was asked to go by a friend last year, but couldn't afford a hotel at the time. 

Work found out (I have a big mouth) and offered to be a sponsor! A big bonus to this, I got to bring one of our very expensive ROMER arms with a  laser scanner. 

The show was a blast! I am still recuperating.

Considering I own nearly half of the 3d printers I'd seen running in person, the show was EPIC. So many machines! So many people.  The people there listed like my version of a hollywood blockbuster movie!   Prusa, Tonokip, Logxen, Seward, Os1r1s, and more!

I brought my 2 printers. Each has something a bit unique. One has a water cooled hot end, which is rare. The other uses both belts and fishing line on the save drive line, which I have not seen done before.

I didn't even get a chance to take many photos. Disappointing, but an excuse to go again next year.

There was  a local who had lost his hands to bacterial meningitis a few years ago. A last minute project was to have the people who brought printers there print out a pair of robot hands for him. I had the scanner, so I scanned in his arms. By the time the show was over, there was half of one arm printed. It was just SO crazy busy that we just couldn't get it done at the show. The project is getting finished after the show.

In album MRRF2014

This is my portable robot building fastener set. It has many of the the important bits besides structural components. The most important tool is the brain-juice!

Yeah, that’s right, I had lunch with the guy with the reddit Up Vote Orange Challenger.  Crazy cool!

The first Makergear M2 I’ve seen in person. I like it.

Packing up for the show. My Mendal 3D printer fits into a plastic case I’d rescued from a dumpster. It fits perfectly, like they where designed for each other.

All loaded up and ready to go. Two 3D printers, a laser scanner, a couple of computers & tablets, My robot building kit, some stools & a case of Mt Dew.

Here I am scanning a print to see how accurately the printer was able to hit the design. It did pretty darn good. There is a little bit of ‘shrink’ as the ABS plastic cools, and we can see that.

This came off of one of the printers at the show. I compared the file to the print and it came out quite nicely. Undersized, but the profile matched really nicely.

This printer is just wild! It’s made from really common bolts, fishing line, guitar tuners and massive amounts of creativity.

The Simpson printer really looks like a spider, spinning a web. I just love this thing.

This is another pretty cool printer.

I can’t imagine writing the gcode for this, to push out the coordinates as the bed raises.

This is a twisty machine. The linear rods are also the drive. The math makes my brain hurt!

I like this plastic bowden capture.

I got my printer working off of a cheap tablet. This is going to be SO nice!

I got ALL the nylons…

I tried making a water block for water cooling my MakerGear hot end this weekend…

I tried making a water block for water cooling my MakerGear hot end this weekend.

I failed.
       kinda…

A bit of background as to WHY I would want to do such a project can be found at http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/01/watercooling-my-makergear-prusa-reprap.html I wanted to improve over the coil of copper being that I am about to re-install my 1.75mm hot end for a few lbs of plastic. Going to try ABS for the first time at this size. Not sure if I am going to have problems with that or not.

My fail is I was too lazy to go out into the cold to drill a hole on the drill press. I managed to salvage my stupid hole with a bit of tubing. Hopefully it doesn't cost me too much in efficiency.

I really have no idea what I am doing when it comes to using a lathe. Learning from YouTube is difficult as many of the videos posted are by people with as much experience as me (about 3 hours at this point).

Well, the next iteration should be better, right? I enjoyed making this enough I wouldn't mind making it again. But with a drill press. I think I will drill that hole first so I know it's right.

In album Machining a water block FAIL

Using my UNiMAT lathe to fix my lousy hack saw cut and bring the aluminum block down to the right dimensions.

I turned down the black insulator a bit as I don’t have metric drill bits. The bigger tube is to couple airline tubing together on the OUTSIDE so I don’t get even more restrictions of water flow.

THERE I FIXED IT. I ran a bit of aquarium air hose through the buggered up hole. I am going to lose a lot of heat removal capability, but it lets me temporarily salvage this part. The water going through is in it’s mid 60s, so there is going to be a big difference, so it should pull heat well.

Until I make a new one.

I cut a piece of aluminium in half with a hack saw. The tray did a decent job of collecting the aluminum dust. Terrible surface finish on the cut. I did not do a good job of making the cut straight.

I tried drilling the hole using a hand drill because it’s COLD out in the garage where my drill press is.

I FAILED. I totally didn’t get things where they wanted to go. I’ve a hole on the inside, and a double hole on one end.

I can JUST snap the wooden clip in place with the water block installed. It’s going to be a royal pain to un-clip it.

The water block is small and light. It should work well I hope.