I recently picked up a Seek Thermal camera which plugs into my cell phone and allows…

I recently picked up a Seek Thermal camera which plugs into my cell phone and allows me to see temperatures of stuff. It's a cheap unit, so it doesn't have the built in calibration tables that the expensive 'real' test equipment has. But it's good enough for most people's needs in a non-technical use.

I am reading all up on emissivity, and the science of how it works. Because this influences my usage of my laser cutter, and blacksmithing and even cooking and anything that relies on heat.

So I decided I am going to make a Mobile Science set. Mobile is dual usage, one, it's portable, two it's centered around my mobile phone.

My phone has a lot of sensors and capabilities already.

The Seek Thermal camera gives the phone another super power.

I also want to add a Consumer Physics SCiO https://www.consumerphysics.com/myscio/ which is a molecular identifier. I've wanted this thing since they ran it on kickstarter several years ago. I have actually seen it work in person and absolutely love what it can do. I think it will turn out to be a disruptive technology. This item will be the primary tool in my Mobile Science lab once I get one.

To compliment these two IR different sensors, I want an assortment of basic hand tools that will facilitate in preparing materials for the phone accessories.

I will be working with botany and geology. Also a bit of chemistry.

Optics is a pretty natural option too, given the camera on the phone. I will be making some bead lens microscope adapters for the cell phone camera. A spectrograph as well.

I also found a phone accessory weather sensor that I will be picking up.

I made up a cardboard tray on my laser cutter to organize the few bits I have gathered already. These are fitting in a waterproof cell phone case. I am looking for a waterproof tablet case.

My goal is to have a solid Science Lab the size of a Science textbook. I will likely carry this set about anywhere I go.

I am crazy excited about this idea.

In album 2/22/17

I tried using my laser engraver to strip paint and mark the metal.

The paint stripping worked remarkably well.

I also tried using some dry moly lube as an engraving agent. This also works well. The laser can't touch metal, the metal acts like a mirror unless much more powerful than I have.

In album 1/22/17

Using the laser to strip paint.

One pass doesn’t do a great job, but the 2nd pass does.

I did a test with a quarter of the tin at different number of passes. Top is 4, bottom is 1 pass. There is a cut across just to check the pass count.

Two passes at this speed and power.

I burned the tin to darken it. I also used moly lube to label it. I accidently labeled the wrong side.

I wrote a bit of OpenScad to laser cut a leather pen case

https://github.com/creuzerm/openscad-projects/tree/master/laserable/Pen%20Case

I cut it and am looking at it and while it looks good, I think it is flawed.

The little round holes for stitching are easy to tell a robot to make. However, I am thinking that they actually overly weaken the seam.

I didn't look for the wisdom in the old fashioned hand tools.

The best stitching punches put little slits at a diagonal to the seam. I think this is actually very clever. This directs any tearing forces away from the next stitch hole and also not directly towards the edge.

So back to the drawing board so to speak and change the code to cut slits.

Than time to test and see if the slits really do make for a stronger seam.

In album 1/9/17

Years ago I had dubbed my rubber mallet "sudo !!"

I've acquired more hammers since, and very recently a laser cutter.

So I've engraved "sudo !!" on my newer rubber mallet that my kids gave me. I also named a small machinist hammer "Subtle Persuasion".

Totally loving the ability to permanently label my stuff with such ease that I don't have time to consider if I ought to.

In album 12/17/16