I love having a 3D printer in the house

A new hobby is botany. So I made up a leather tool roll and bought some tools. A self closing tweezers is on the list, but I would need to order one. I thought I could print a decent one.

I was right.

Nothing available to download on the thing sites yet, so I designed something in OpenScad. It took 2 ten minute prints to get it right. Cost is a quarter each set.

The two halves are "rivited" together with a bit of plastic filament.

I love the future.

In album 6/28/15

My botany books and my botany tool roll. And the kids playing in the yard while I work up this catnip plant ( I got for mosquito repellant for the kids ) in both the books.

I designed and 3D printed this self closing tweezers to hold plants so I can look at them with the loupe.

It was a bit difficult reading through the books with the kids interrupting me with new plants to look up about every 90 seconds. Luckily I know a good portion of what’s in the yard so I could quickly send them off, looking for more.

The tweezers are the expensive bit – from the eyebrow-plucking section in Walmart. The Loupe and ‘microscope’ loupe are out of China on Ebay. Cost less than one of the eyebrow tweezers. Crazyness.

My 3d printed self closing tweezers are the most awesome, of course, but that is just me thinking highly of them.

I've been without a 3d printer for over half a year now

They both just kept breaking while working on some stuff for http://enablingthefuture.org/ and my bubble gum repairs wasn't holding them together anymore.

My 'Scribbler' (named in part for it's original creator and the fact that I have it set up for fast, sloppy prints) is the easier fix as I can fix it with tools and not printed parts.

I've only had the parts for maybe 3 months? Finally got to modifying the bits so they work together.

It's amazing how much better buying a few parts for a few bucks works.

In album Scribbler Short Bowden Tube mark 2

I machined part of the sholders off on the brass fitting so it would sit in the carrier and made a plastic nut. The intent is that it matches the groove mount that the EZstruder can work with so well.

The fitting now just sits in the EZstruder like it was made for it.

The bottom piece I just drilled out with a varibit, reamed a bit with a flat screwdriver and pushed hard to get the NPT threads to bite into the plastic. As long as this bit doesn’t get hot enough to soften the PLA I think I should be fine.

The updated short bowden tube.

A google plus auto-awesome animated gif. The right #3DBenchy failed due to a loose connection on the extruder wiring. The left one is my 2nd successful print with the new feed system. The current print is a few tweaks to get it to print faster, better.

Playing with the new Microsoft Hyperlapse app. Lets face it printing videos are only interesting to the people who’s machine it is. The print motion is a bit twitchy, but it’s a twitchy printer. The pan motion is very nice and smooth.

A few months back, I gave a hand to Layla

Literally. http://bit.ly/hotpinkcyborgbeast

I worked with a couple other volunteers in the evenings for a few months to create a website where people can go to easily create prosthetic hands for kids. Like Layla. This website tool has been called the Hand-O-Matic. Layla's hand was the very first hand to come from this website. http://bit.ly/handomatic Welcome to the future. A future of 3D printers and where 2 measurements and half a dozen clicks and a custom prosthetic hand is created.

Time to finish this quest. 

I have given Layla a hand in the literal sense, I have given Layla a hand in the virtual sense by making it easy for her to get the ready-to-print files to make more hands as she grows. Now I am giving Layla a hand by helping her get her own 3D printer.

And I need your help.

November 8th, Layla's real-world community is getting together to finish what a virtual, on-line community started.

We are hosting a fund-raiser benefit to get Layla a 3D printer of her very own. We are going to get a computer that she can use easily with her 1 good hand. We are going to get her the supplies she needs to put new prosthetic hands together. And then this real, local, community is going to give the larger, virtual community a hand as everything above and beyond Layla's needs will be donated to http://enablingthefuture.org/ so we will give other kids a hand – Literally.

So come. Learn about the future. There will be 3d printers there that you can touch and ask questions about. Come, and be a part of a girls future and donate a few bucks – enter the raffle, bid on something in the silent auction.

Come and Give a Hand to Layla.

In album 2014-11-04

Layla’s hand

Give a hand to Layla

I rebuilt the extruder on my Delta #RepRap again

I rebuilt the extruder on my Delta #RepRap again. Trying different things to find something that works for me. This is a cable-laced short bowden tube with no 'real' connectors. Quick and dirty, but it seems to be working well so far.

In album Repaired stubby bowden tube

The cable lacing is where the hold-it-all-together should happen. This is with Spectra fishing line. Same as I used for the drive-line. Low stretch. Should keep the two halves from being pushed apart.

Boom! Wonderful printing all of a sudden.

Installed. The idea is to balance the weight of the motor over the effector so the printer doesn’t have to sling all that weight around.

I used some self vulcanizing rubber tape to try to get some traction on the tube. It should also stiffen up the joints a bit so there is less flex at either end and more in the middle.

This is the prior iteration. The nylon kept wanting to stretch so I kept twisting the extruder around to tighten up the cable lacing. 2.5 full turns here! The nylon also dug into the plastic a bit as well.

The RepRap revolution started 6 years ago, today.

6 years ago, today is when the first ‘child’ printer was created.

6 years ago, today, the RepRap revolution started.

RepRaps, or Reproducing Rapid Prototypers are 3d printers that are designed in such a way that you can use one to make a copy of itself. The goal is to be able to use ‘stuff’ that is easily available locally. Today, I could make one using parts bought from Radio Shack, Home Depot, Walmart, and junk inkjet printers sitting in people’s closets, and my existing 3d printer. It’s easier and cheaper to order parts of ebay, but I can cobble one together after a couple hour bike ride.

The hardware is open source –  that means I can download, view, edit, and distribute my changes to the machine for free & legally.

The software is open source – that means I can download, view, edit, and distribute my changes to the software for free & legally.

There are thousands of people who are actively making tweaks and adjustments to the printers & software every single day. Thousands of people who are making these 3d printers better, every day, just for the fun of it.

6 years ago today, the first RepRap begat the 2nd RepRap and the world changed forever.

My college, MSOE, had the largest Rapid Prototyping lab in the world at that time if memory serves correctly. They had millions of dollars in equipment. I remember walking past the glassed windowed RPC and looking at the cool stuff they where making there. Engines for GM, hands for NASA to fit gloves, skulls to solve murder mysteries.

2 years ago, I got my first RepRap for as much money as the TV in my living room – http://mike.creuzer.com/2012/02/i-ordered-my-3d-printer-last-weekend.html. I ordered a kit of parts, and built it over the course of 2 days with help from strangers who where also putting their printers together at the same time.

6 years ago today, RepRaps started a revolution that made 3d printers accessible to me, in my home. My children will grow up never not knowing having having easy access to 3d printers. In their home. My dad remembers when he got indoor plumbing growing up, I remember when our house got it’s own phone number and not a shared number with several of the neighbors. My kids will never not remember a 3d printer or two in their house. This blows my mind. The paradigm shift in their thought processes is revolutionary – http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/07/bella-printed-a-missing-part-for-one-of-her-toys.html.

I’ve come up with a few ideas of my own – hybrid drivelines http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/04/delta-reprap-using-both-belts-and-spectra-fishing-line.html, hooking up my printer to my fish tank http://mike.creuzer.com/2013/01/watercooling-my-makergear-prusa-reprap.html, and a temp monitoring idea across the printer as a hole.

The people who have made the RepRap revolution possible deserve much gratitude. I’ve been able to meet in person many of the ‘key’ people who have made RepRaps possible – the (re)designers of the hardware, the (re)designers of the firmware, the (re)designers of the electronics.

Today, today is Mr. Bowyer’s day. Thank you. We will probably never meet in person, but you have changed my life & my children’s life. For that, Thank you.